Sunday, November 17, 2013

Questions and Answers : Place of Publication

RESOURCE DESCRIPTION & ACCESS RDA

Question asked on the Facebook Page of RDA Blog.

Mike Selby : In the 260 or 264 Field, do states and provinces need to be completely spelled out (California) or still abbreviated (CA)?

Answer: According to RDA Rule 2.8.2.3 for recording place of publication - Include both the local place name (city, town, etc.) and the name of the larger jurisdiction or jurisdictions (state, province, etc., and/or country) if present on the source of information.

EXCERPT FROM THE RDA BLOG POST 

Publication Data in a 260 Field : LC-PCC Best Practices Guidelines


Myth:
“I can continue to record the publication data in a 260 field.”

Reality:

Incorrect.  The 260 has been replaced with the 264 field, for original cataloging using RDA.  Remember, also, to properly code the second indicator according to the function of the entity recorded in this field.

Myth:
“I am not required to transcribe the larger jurisdiction for the place of publication.”

Reality:
Wrong!  You are required to record this if it is present -- whether or not you think it is needed.

Myth:
“OK -- but I cannot add the larger jurisdiction if it is not present on the resource.”

Reality:
Again, wrong!  You are free to add -- in brackets -- the larger jurisdiction if you think it helpful.

Myth:
“Whenever you supply a place of publication, publisher, or date of publication in brackets, you must include a question mark.”

Reality:
No, the question mark simply means that you are relatively uncertain of your inference.  For example, if you are sure that the Museum of Modern Art is in New York, you don’t need a question mark; if you only ‘think’ it is the one in New York, you can add a question mark.