RDA FAQ

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RDA FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS - RDA FAQ

Resource Description and Access Frequently Asked Questions (RDA FAQ) is an initiative of Resource Description & Access (RDA) (or RDA Blog) to compile a list of questions people ask about RDA. Answers to frequently asked questions (FAQ) about Resource Description and Access (RDA) are given from the articles of RDA Blog in abbreviated form with links to the main articles. As RDA continue to be developed, questions and answers will be added and revised from time to time.

Some of the answers to questions are taken from Glossary of Library and Information Science of Librarianship Studies and Information Technology blog, which is a partner blog of RDA Blog. Both of these blogs are authored by Salman Haider.


Resource Description & Access FAQ

  • What is RDA?
  • Why is it necessary to issue a brand new standard?
  • What are the benefits of RDA? / Why is RDA needed?
  • What are the foundations of RDA? / What are FRBR, FRAD, and FRSAD? What are their relationship to RDA? / How does RDA relate to the Statement of International Cataloguing Principles (ICP)?
  • Who developed RDA?
  • How can I access RDA? / Who publishes RDA? / What is RDA Toolkit?
  • What is the difference between RDA Toolkit and RDA?
  • What does RDA Toolkit include?
  • How often will RDA Toolkit be updated?
  • What does RDA cost?
  • What is RDA Blog or Resource Description & Access (RDA) blog?
  • Who is responsible for the ongoing development of RDA?
  • What is the process of suggesting changes to RDA?
  • When was RDA released?
  • When was RDA implemented?
  • What needs to be done to implement RDA in individual libraries?
  • Has OCLC released a policy statement on RDA?
  • What is the structure of RDA?
  • What are RDA Core Elements?
  • What are Alternatives Options & Exceptions in RDA?
  • What is LC-PCC PS?
  • Where are RDA Examples?
  • Can a record cataloged by the RDA standard be readily identified?
  • What differences will I see in my MARC records?
  • Does RDA focus on the recording of data, the presentation of data, or both?
  • Is ISBD punctuation required in RDA?
  • Why aren’t GMDs (general material designations) in RDA?
  • Where is the information for RDA Cataloging News and new articles, books, presentation, thesis, and videos on RDA?
  • What are the guidelines for Undifferentiated Personal Names in RDA Cataloging?
  • How to Give Date of Publication Distribution Copyright in RDA & MARC 21?
  • How to to Record Name of Publisher in RDA AACR2 & MARC 21?
  • How to Transcribe Place of Publication in RDA & AACR2 & MARC 21?
  • Where are the Links to Important RDA Blog Posts on Recording Production Publication Distribution Manufacture Statements and Dates in RDA and MARC 21 Field 264?
  • What are the Featured Categories of RDA Blog?
  • Where is the RDA History Timeline?

RESOURCE DESCRIPTION AND ACCESS RDA

WHAT IS RDA?

RDA stands for “Resource Description and Access” and is the title of the standard, that is the successor to AACR2. Resource Description and Access (RDA) is a standard for descriptive cataloging providing instructions and guidelines on formulating bibliographic data. Resource Description & Access (RDA) is a set of cataloging instructions based on FRBR and FRAD, for producing the description and name and title access points representing a resource. RDA offers libraries the potential to change significantly how bibliographic data is created and used. RDA is a standard for resource description and access designed for the digital world. It provides (i) A flexible framework for describing all resources (analog and digital) that is extensible for new types of material, (ii) Data that is readily adaptable to new and emerging database structures, (iii) Data that is compatible with existing records in online library catalogs. RDA is a package of data elements, guidelines, and instructions for creating library and cultural heritage resource metadata that are well-formed according to international models for user-focused linked data applications.  RDA goes beyond earlier cataloging codes in that it provides guidelines on cataloging digital resources and places a stronger emphasis on helping users find, identify, select, and obtain the information they want. RDA also supports the clustering of bibliographic records in order to show relationships between works and their creators. 

References:

WHY IT IS NECESSARY TO ISSUE A BRAND NEW STANDARD?

AACR2 was first published in 1978. Although it has been updated many times, it is largely designed for an environment dominated by the card catalog. The International Conference on the Principles and Future Development of AACR that was held in Toronto in 1997 identified substantive problems with AACR2. Although the updates issued in the years following that conference addressed some of these problems, it became clear that a fundamental rethinking of the code was required to respond fully to the challenges and opportunities of the digital world. ("Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA." RDA: Resource Description and Access, Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved from http://www.rda-jsc.org/rdafaq.html#1)

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF RDA? / WHY IS RDA NEEDED?

RDA builds on the strengths of AACR2 but has some new features that make it more useful for description as a cataloging code for the digital environment in which libraries now operate.
  • RDA is better at catering for digital resources and for resources with multiple characteristics, and will provide more guidance on the creation of authority headings.
  • RDA has been developed with the end-user in mind.
  • RDA provides a consistent, flexible and extensible framework for the description of all types of resources, including digital resources and those with multiple characteristics.
  • RDA is compatible with internationally established principles, models and standards.
  • RDA is compatible with a range of encoding schemas, such as MODS, Dublin Core, ONIX and MARC.  It will allow library bibliographic records to be integrated with those produced by other metadata communities, and to move into the digital environment beyond library catalogs.
  • RDA will enable, with systems support, the grouping together of bibliographic records for different editions, translations or formats of a work, to achieve a more meaningful display of data for users.
  • RDA is a Web-based product, which enables catalogers to move between related instructions using hyperlinks, and to integrate their own institutional policies.  
  • RDA is a transitional stepping stone that requires only small changes to catalog records but moves the metadata in catalogs much closer to full utilization of FRBR models.

WHAT ARE THE FOUNDATIONS OF RDA? / WHAT ARE FRBR, FRAD, AND FRSAD? WHAT ARE THEIR RELATIONSHIP TO RDA? / HOW DOES RDA RELATE TO THE STATEMENT OF INTERNATIONAL CATALOGING PRINCIPLES (ICP)?

RDA is based on the conceptual models FRBR (Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records), FRAD (Functional Requirements for Authority Data), and FRSAD (Functional Requirements for Subject Authority Data). The IFLA Statement of International Cataloguing Principles informs the cataloging principles used throughout RDA.

The acronym “FRBR” stands for Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records. FRBR was developed by an IFLA Study Group (1992-1997) and the FRBR Review Group is responsible for its ongoing development.
FRBR includes a conceptual model of entities and relationships and attributes, identifies specific user tasks (Find, Identify, Select, and Obtain) that bibliographic records are intended to fulfill, and recommends a set of elements for inclusion in national bibliographic records.

FRBR provides the conceptual foundation for RDA. RDA includes the FRBR terminology when appropriate (for example, use of the names of bibliographic entities: “work”, “expression”, “manifestation”, and “item”), uses the FRBR attributes as the basis for specific data elements to be included in bibliographic descriptions, addresses FRBR relationships, and uses the FRBR user tasks as the basis for defining a set of core data elements.

The acronym “FRAD” stands for Functional Requirements for Authority Data. This later conceptual model was also developed by an IFLA Study Group. The FRBR Review Group is working to merge this model with FRBR. The JSC used FRAD as the basis for instructions on authority control; the user tasks for authority data are Find, Identify, Clarify, and Understand.

The acronym "FRSAD" stands for Functional Requirements for Subject Authority Data. This later conceptual model was also developed by an IFLA Study Group. The FRBR Review Group is also working to merge this model with FRBR. The RDA element for the subject relationship generally reflects the relationship associated with the entity work as defined in FRSAD.

RDA was initially developed concurrently with the work being undertaken by IFLA (the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) to revise the 1961 Paris Principles. Members of the JSC participated in the first of the series of IFLA meetings by the international cataloguing experts and in the ongoing work on the revision of the Paris Principles. The resulting IFLA Statement of International Cataloguing Principles informs the cataloguing principles used throughout RDA. The JSC will monitor the ongoing development of ICP.


WHO DEVELOPED RDA?

The creation of RDA was the result of collaboration among representatives from United States, Canada, Great Britain, Germany, and Australia. RDA: Resource Description and Access was developed by the RDA Steering Committee (formerly the Joint Steering Committee in for the Development of RDA) as part of its strategic plan (2005-2009) to replace the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, 2nd Revised Edition. The project is overseen by the Committee of Principals representing American Library Association, Canadian Library Association, CILIP: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, Deutsche Nationalbibliothek, Library of Congress, Library and Archives Canada, British Library, and National Library of Australia.

HOW CAN I ACCESS RDA? / WHO PUBLISHES RDA? / WHAT IS RDA TOOLKIT?

RDA is available as an online, web-based product called the RDA Toolkit. Although the preferred way for most users to access RDA is online via the RDA Toolkit, print copies of the RDA instructions are also be available for purchase.

The Co-Publishers, consisting of the three national associations (The American Library Association, the Canadian Library Association, and the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals) are responsible for issuing RDA. The three associations serve as joint publishers for RDA, both for the online product and any offline products.

RDA Toolkit is published by the RDA Co-Publishers—American Library Association, Canadian Library Association, and Facet Publishing, the publishing arm of CILIP: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. ALA Publishing is responsible for the day-to-day management and development of RDA Toolkit.

For information on RDA Toolkit subscription options and pricing please visit the Co-Publishers website http://www.rdatoolkit.org/pricing. The site includes full details for consortia and group subscriptions and special extensions for training and classroom access.

For further details about RDA print products visit the Co-Publisher site. For libraries outside North America pricing and ordering information for print copies is available at Facet Publishing along with other newly published RDA related resources.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RDA TOOLKIT AND RDA?

RDA Toolkit is an integrated, browser-based, online product that allows users to interact with a collection of cataloging-related documents and resources, including RDA: Resource Description and Access.

WHAT DOES RDA TOOLKIT INCLUDE?

RDA Toolkit includes:
  • RDA instructions in English, French, and German that are searchable and browsable
  • AACR2 Rule Number Search of RDA instructions through the Advanced Search menu.
  • Workflows and other procedural documentation that is created by subscribers and can be shared within an organization or with the entire community of subscribers.
  • Mappings of RDA to different schemas, including MARC 21.
  • Two views of RDA content—by table of contents and by element set
  • Full text of AACR2
  • Library of Congress-Program for Cooperative Cataloging Policy Statements(LC-PPC PS)
  • National Library of Australia Policy Statements (NLA PS)
  • British Library Policy Statements (BL PS)
  • Anwendungsrichtlinien für den deutschsprachigen Raum (D-A-CH AWR)
  • Music Library Association Best Practices (MLA BP)
  • MARC Record Examples of RDA Cataloging
  • What you need to evaluate and implement RDA; to make cataloging decisions based on principles; to increase efficiency; to facilitate collaboration; and to help position the community for the future by making bibliographic data accessible on the Web.

HOW OFTEN WILL RDA TOOLKIT BE UPDATED?

RDA content is under the control of the Joint Steering Committee, and details on the content update process can be found on their website at http://rda-jsc.org/content/rda_faq#2. Changes to the functionality of RDA Toolkit will happen at fairly regular intervals. In recent years there have been updates on RDA Toolkit in February, April, August, and October.

WHAT DOES RDA COST?

For information about cost and pricing options, see the publishers’ website.

WHAT IS RDA BLOG OR RESOURCE DESCRIPTION & ACCESS (RDA) BLOG?

RDA Blog is a blog on Resource Description and Access (RDA), a new library cataloging standard that provides instructions and guidelines on formulating data for resource description and discovery, organized based on the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR), intended for use by libraries and other cultural organizations replacing Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR2). RDA Blog lists description and links to resources on Resource Description & Access (RDA). It is an attempt to bring together at one place all the useful and important information, rules, references, news, and links on Resource Description and Access, FRBR, FRAD, FRSAD, MARC standards, AACR2, BIBFRAME, and other items related to current developments and trends in library cataloging practice.

RDA Blog History: RDA Blog is the first and oldest blog exclusively devoted to Resource Description and Access (RDA). RDA Blog was created by Salman Haider, a Cataloging & Metadata Librarian, Wikipedian, Blogger & Online Social Media Expert from India. RDA Blog embarked on its journey to provide useful information about Resource Description and Access (RDA) in August 2011. It received good response from librarians, catalogers, and library professionals from all around the world. It is interesting to note that the first hundred thousand page views to RDA Blog came in 3 years, but it took just 8 months to reach another hundred thousand page views. As per RDA Blog Traffic Stats [2016-01-26] RDA Blog is viewed more than 400000 times in 167 countries all around the world, chiefly being the United States. At present, it is viewed at a rate of fifteen to twenty thousand times per month. RDA Blog is widely followed in social media, referred by major universities, libraries, and library schools, cited in books and articles, and trusted as an authoritative source on Resource Description and Access (RDA) cataloging rules.

Follow RDA Blog in Social Media: Google+ | Facebook | Google+ Community | Twitter | YouTube | SlideShare | Tumblr | WordPress | Flipboard | Pinterest | LinkedIn

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE ONGOING DEVELOPMENT OF RDA?

The Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA (JSC), the current name of the committee, is responsible for the ongoing development of RDA. The JSC now consists of representatives from seven cataloguing communities. These include the American Library Association (ALA), the Australian Committee on Cataloguing (ACOC), the British Library (BL), the Canadian Committee on Cataloguing (CCC), the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), the Deutsche Nationalbibliothek (also including Austria and the German-speaking parts of Switzerland), and the U.S. Library of Congress (LC). The JSC representatives are assisted by the Chair of JSC, the Secretary of JSC, the Examples Editor, and various working groups (see question 2.3). See the list of JSC members.

WHAT IS THE PROCESS OF SUGGESTING CHANGES TO RDA?

Proposals for changes to RDA emanating from within the author constituencies of RDA should be submitted through their respective member bodies of JSC. See the information about that process.

Proposals for changes to RDA emanating from outside the author countries of RDA should be submitted to the Chair of JSC. Guidelines for submitting a proposal and a sample proposal will be posted on the website soon.

Comments on and questions about RDA can also be posted on RDA-L, an electronic forum for discussion of RDA. For details about RDA-L, see the information about the forum: http://lists.ala.org/wws/info/rda-l.

WHEN WAS RDA RELEASED?

RDA was initially released in June 2010.

WHEN WAS RDA IMPLEMENTED?

RDA was implemented in 2013 by the Library of Congress and other major libraries in United States and Europe.

WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE TO IMPLEMENT RDA IN INDIVIDUAL LIBRARIES?

Each library will need to decide when they will implement RDA. RDA implementation will typically include training of staff and possibly a review of existing cataloging workflows and policy decisions.

Conversion of existing records will generally not be necessary, as records created using RDA were made to integrate with AACR2 records in existing databases. The global updating of headings will be required in a few cases. For example, there will be changes to the structure of Bible uniform titles, and the abbreviated word "Dept." will be spelled out in full. The JSC has kept these changes to a minimum.

Changes to MARC21 have been made to accommodate new RDA data elements. Libraries will need to consult with their library system vendor about the vendor's plans to accommodate RDA changes.

Library systems will need to support the creation and exchange of RDA data.  Systems vendors are aware of this impending change, that will require MARC21 changes. These MARC21 changes will need to be incorporated by vendors into the cataloging modules of library systems. This will enable the importing and/or exporting of bibliographic and authority records. Changes will also be required to indexes in library systems to allow for the search and display of new data elements.

Changes to existing records will generally not be necessary as records created using RDA were designed to integrate with AACR2 records in existing databases. However, global updating of headings will be required in a few cases, for example the headings for "Bible" will change in RDA and also headings for corporate names that include the abbreviation "Dept."

HAS OCLC RELEASED A POLICY STATEMENT ON RDA?

Yes. OCLC’s policy statement is found at http://www.oclc.org/rda/new-policy.en.html.

WHAT IS THE STRUCTURE OF RDA?

General Structure

Remember that RDA has a clear structure:
  • Table of Contents
  • Introduction
  • Specific instructions
o   Entities and their attributes
·            Group 1 (WEMI) (Chapters 1-7)
·            Group 2 (PFC) (Chapters 8-16)
o   Relationships (Chapters 17-22, 24-32)
  • Appendices for
o   Abbreviation
o   Capitalization
o   Relationship designators (more on this later)
  • Glossary with links to the text of the instructions
  • Index
Contents
  • Definition of RDA Core Elements
  • Types RDA Core Elements
  • Examples of RDA Core Elements
Core elements in Resource Description & Access (RDA) are minimum elements required for describing resources. Core elements are a new feature of RDA which allowed for certain metadata elements to be identified as “required” in the cataloging process. The assignment of core status is based on attributes mandatory for a national level record, as documented in the FRBR/FRAD modules. At a minimum, a bibliographic description should include all the required core elements that are applicable. Core-ness is identified at the element level. Some elements are always core (if applicable and the information is available); some are core only in certain situations. Core elements are identified in two ways within RDA. The first is that all core elements are discussed in general, and listed as a group, in the sub-instructions of "RDA 0.6: Core Elements". In the separate chapters, the core elements are also identified individually by the label “CORE ELEMENT” at the beginning of the instructions for each element. They are clearly labeled in light blue at each core instruction in RDA Toolkit. If the status of an element as core depends upon the situation, an explanation appears after the “Core element” label. See, for example, this label for the core element for the title. ... ... ... (Read full article on the source mentioned below)

[Source: Core Elements]

WHAT ARE  ALTERNATIVES OPTIONS &  EXCEPTIONS?

Contents
  • Alternatives Options and Exceptions in RDA : What Every Cataloger Needs to Know
  • What are RDA Alternatives?
  • Example of RDA Alternatives
  • What are RDA Options?
  • Example of RDA Optional Additions
  • Example of RDA Optional Omissions
  • What are RDA Exceptions? 
  • Example of RDA Exceptions
  • How to decide whether to apply the alternatives, options, or exceptions?
  • Note on the use of screen images from RDA Toolkit (Following RDA and RDA Toolkit Copyright Statement and guidelines)
Alternatives Options and Exceptions in RDA : What Every Cataloger Needs to Know
RDA contains a number of guidelines and instructions that are marked as alternatives, options (optional additions, optional omissions), and exceptions. Each of these is clearly identified by an italicized label, which in the RDA Toolkit appears in green color in the instruction (alternative, optional addition, optional omission, exception). A green vertical bar also appears in the left margin next of an alternative, optional, or exceptional instruction in RDA Toolkit. These allow individual libraries or cataloging agencies to make decisions based on individual considerations in cases where two or more provisions are equally valid. Guidelines for alternatives and options are provided in RDA rule 0.8, and instructions for applying exceptions is at RDA 0.9 of chapter 0. ... ... ... (Read full article on the source mentioned below)


WHAT IS LC-PCC PS?

LC-PCC PS stands for Library of Congress Policy Statements. LC has created an extensive body of Library of Congress Policy Statements (LCPS), to facilitate a standard interpretation and application of these alternatives, options, and exceptions.  Think of these as the ‘RDA version’ of the LC Rule Interpretations. Be sure to consult and follow the LCPS in all such cases. To access the LCPS, click on the green “LCPS” link in the RDA Toolkit. [Note: LCPS is now LC-PCC PS]

WHERE ARE RDA EXAMPLES?

In RDA Toolkit the examples in RDA illustrate the application of the specific instruction under which they appear. They illustrate only the data that are addressed by that instruction. They are normally given without showing the preceding or enclosing punctuation that is prescribed for an ISBD presentation. All examples illustrate elements as they would be recorded by an agency whose preferred language is English. Examples appear in yellow shading, clearly setting them off from the instructions themselves.

CAN A RECORD CATALOGED BY THE RDA STANDARD BE READILY IDENTIFIED?

Yes, an RDA record will have both a value of “i” coded for Description and a 040 $e rda.

WHAT DIFFERENCES WILL I SEE IN MY MARC RECORDS?

You will see some notable differences in MARC records cataloged under the RDA standards. RDA records will not have General Material Designators (GMD’s—245 $h). Instead each RDA record will have a 336 for the content type, a 337 for media type, and a 338 for carrier type. Rather than a single non-repeatable 260 containing the publication, distribution, manufacture and copyright information, this information is given in the repeatable 264. If needed, multiple 264s are used to individually call out the publisher, distribution, manufacture, and copyright information. You may notice more relator terms attached to access points, as well as the spelling out of non-transcribed abbreviations. Although records we create according to the RDA standard will continue to follow current capitalization rules in the 245, you may notice member contributed RDA records that use the alternative capitalization rule.

DOES RDA FOCUS ON THE RECORDING OF DATA, THE PRESENTATION OF DATA, OR BOTH?

RDA establishes a clear line of separation between the recording of data and the presentation of data. The major focus of RDA is providing guidelines and instructions on recording data to reflect attributes of, and relationships between, the entities defined in FRBR and FRAD.

IS ISBD PUNCTUATION REQUIRED IN RDA?

The ISBD order of areas, data elements and punctuation is not required. Information on presenting RDA data in an ISBD display appears in Appendix D.


WHY AREN'T GMDs (GENERAL MATERIAL DESIGNATIONS) IN RDA?

The GMDs were often a mixture of content and carrier. In RDA the information about content and carrier is separated into three elements:
-- content type (e.g., cartographic, textual, still image) – an attribute of an expression
-- media type (a general indication of the type of carrier, e.g., audio, projected) – an attribute of a manifestation
-- carrier type (e.g., audiocassette, slide, volume) – an attribute of a manifestation.
Representatives from the publishing community ONIX and the JSC established the original vocabularies for content, media, and carrier type based on a common framework for resource categorization (RDA/ONIX Framework). Because the content and carriers of resources collected by libraries and other information agencies continue to change, the JSC established a working group to update and maintain that Framework.

There will still be the possibility to give users an "early warning" regarding the content and carrier of the resource. However, that action will be taken in relation to the display of the data rather than the recording of the data. Also, the controlled terms in the RDA instructions for content, media, and carrier types can be replaced in local displays by terms chosen for local users.

Terminology used to indicate extent of the manifestation (called specific material designations in AACR2) includes some terms that are the same as carrier types; it is easy at first to confuse the two elements Carrier type and Extent. Other extent terms are specified in vocabulary lists of instructions for specific carriers; terms in common usage may be used.

WHERE IS THE INFORMATION FOR RDA CATALOGING NEWS AND NEW ARTICLES BOOKS PRESENTATIONS THESIS AND VIDEOS ON RDA?

Information on RDA Cataloging News and new articles, books, presentation, thesis, and videos on RDA is published in RDA Blog posts written under the category (label) RDA CATALOGING NEWS and ARTICLES BOOKS PRESENTATIONS ETC. You can also "Like" the Facebook Page Resource Description and Access - RDA and join the Google+ Community RDA Cataloging to be updated on new developments in RDA. See also RDA Bibliography.

WHAT ARE  THE GUIDELINES FOR UNDIFFERENTIATED PERSONAL NAMES IN RDA CATALOGING?

Contents
  • What is a Name Authority Record for Person
  • What is an undifferentiated Name Authority Record
  • What is the latest best practice on undifferentiated Name Authority Record
  • Maintenance of existing undifferentiated records
  • Examples of maintenance of undifferentiated Name Authority Records
  • RDA attributes to create a unique authorized access point for the person being established
  • Questions and Answers
What is a Name Authority Record for Person: According to Glossary of Library & Information Science of Librarianship Studies and Information Technology blog  Name Authority Record is a record which gives the authoritative form (the form selected for a heading) of a personal name in the library catalog or the file of bibliographic records, and are listed in an authority file containing headings of library items. To ensure consistency, an authority record is created for each authorized heading (authorized access point) for a proper name. An authority record is made when a heading is established, i.e., authorized for use as the main entry or an added entry for the first time, while cataloging of a library item. ... ... ... (Read full article on the source mentioned below)



HOW TO GIVE DATE OF PUBLICATION DISTRIBUTION COPYRIGHT IN RDA & MARC 21?

Contents
  • Core Element
  • How Date of Publication is defined
  • Where the Rules are for Date of Publication in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Information for Date of Publication in RDA
  • How is Date of Publication Transcribed / Recorded in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
  • Dates of the Non-Gregorian or Julian Calendar; Dates in the Form of Chronogram
  • RDA Examples
  • What to do if the date on the resource is incorrect
  • Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources
  • Date of Publication not Identified in a Single-Part Resource
  • RDA Cataloging Examples of Dates
  • Supplying Dates (Date of Publication Not Identified in the Resource)
  • Importance of Supplying Probable Place and Date of Publication
  • Examples of Supplying Publication Data
  • Other RDA Examples of Dates
  • Date of Distribution
  • Where the Rules are for Date of Distribution in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Information for Date of Distribution in RDA
  • Recording Date of Distribution
  • Dates of the Non-Gregorian or Julian Calendar; Dates in the Form of Chronogram
  • Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources
  • Date of Distribution Not Identified in a Single-Part Resource
  • Copyright Date
  • Coreness for Copyright Date
  • Where the Rules are for Copyright Date in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Copyright Date in RDA
  • Recording Copyright Dates
  • Other RDA Blog posts on Publication, Distribution, and Copyright Date
Core Element: Date of publication is a Core Element; If the date of publication appears on the source of information in more than one calendar, only the date in the calendar preferred by the agency preparing the description is required. ... ... ... (Read full article on the source mentioned below)


HOW TO RECORD NAME OF PUBLISHER IN RDA AACR2 & MARC 21?

Contents
    • Core Element
    • How is Publisher's Name is defined
    • Where are Rules for Publisher's Name in RDA
    • What are the Sources of Information for Publisher's Name in RDA
    • How is Publisher's Name Transcribed / Recorded in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
    • More than One Publisher in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
    • Publisher's Name in More Than One Language or Script
    • No Publisher Identified in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
    • MARC 21 Field 264
    • RDA Examples of Recording Publisher's Name in MARC 21 Field 264
    CORE ELEMENT: Publisher's Name is a Core Element; if more than one publisher’s name appears on the source of information, only the first recorded is required.

    How is Publisher's Name is defined: According to the Glossary of Library and Information Science of Librarianship Studies and Information Technology blog, the name of publisher is the name of a person, family, or corporate body responsible for publishing, releasing, or issuing a document or resource. For early printed resources, printers and booksellers are treated as publishers. There are the special set of rules for transcription and recording of the name of the publisher in library cataloging standards, e.g., RDA rules for publisher's name is given in chapter 2 of Resource Description and Access (RDA). In Anglo-American Cataloging Rules 2nd edition (AACR2), rules for the date of publication, distribution etc. for books are given in chapter 2 (2.4D). ... ... ... (Read full article on the source mentioned below)


    HOW TO TRANSCRIBE PLACE OF PUBLICATION IN RDA AACR2 & MARC 21?

    Contents
    • CORE ELEMENT
    • How is Place of Publication defined
    • Where are Rules for Place of Publication in RDA
    • What are the Sources of Information for Place of Publication in RDA
    • How is Place of Publication Transcribed / Recorded in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
    • More than One Place of Publication
    • Language or Script
    • Place of Publication Not Identified
    CORE ELEMENT: Place of Publication is a core element; if more than one place of publication appears on the source of information, only the first recorded is required.

    How is Place of Publication defined: According to the Glossary of Library and Information Science of Librarianship Studies and Information Technology blog, the place of publication is the place associated with the publication, release, or issuing of a resource or document. There are the special set of rules for transcription and recording of the name of the publisher in library cataloging standards, e.g., RDA rules for place of publication is given in chapter 2 (RDA Rule 2.8.2) of Resource Description and Access (RDA). In Anglo-American Cataloging Rules 2nd edition (AACR2), rules for the date of publication, distribution etc. for books are given in chapter 2 (2.4C).
    A place of publication is a place associated with the publication, release, or issuing of a resource. (RDA Rule 2.8.2.1)  ... ... ... (Read full article on the source mentioned below)


    WHERE ARE THE LINKS TO IMPORTANT RDA BLOGS POSTS ON RECORDING PRODUCTION PUBLICATION DISTRIBUTION MANUFACTURE STATEMENTS AND DATES IN RDA AND MARC 21 FIELD 264?


    Some popular RDA Blog posts on PUBLICATION DISTRIBUTION ETC., MARC-260, MARC-264, and DATE using guidelines from RDA RULES-CHAPTER 2 are ... ... ... (Read full article on the source mentioned below)




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    Author: Salman Haider [Revised 2016-05-09 | Written 2012-12-12]

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