Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Top 10 RDA Blog Posts of 2015 on Resource Description & Access Cataloging

RDA Blog

This was the fourth year of RDA Blog on Resource Description and Access (RDA).  We hope that our posts have been both interesting and helpful to all librarians and catalogers. As 2015 comes to a close, I want to share our most read articles of the year.

Top 10 RDA Blog Posts of 2015 

  1. RDA Cataloging Rules for Pseudonyms with MARC 21 Examples
  2. International Standard Book Number (ISBN) - MARC to RDA Mapping
  3. RDA Cataloging Examples
  4. Articles, Books, Presentations on Resource Description and Access (RDA)
  5. Establishing Certain Entities in the Name or Subject Authority File : RDA Cataloging
  6. Libhub Initiative
  7. Corrected Titles Proper & Variant Titles : RDA vs AACR2 : Questions and Answers & Best Practices
  8. RDA Bibliography
  9. LC RDA Implementation of Relationship Designators in Bibliographic Records
  10. 33X fields do not necessarily mean RDA
Thank you for reading RDA Blog on Resource Description and Access (RDA)! Happy New Year, friends!

Resource Description and Access


Friday, December 25, 2015

Name of Publisher in RDA & AACR2 & MARC 21 Examples

Resource Description & Access RDA

Publisher's Name in Resource Description and Access (RDA) & Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR2) with MARC 21 Examples

Table of Contents:
  • Core Element
  • How is Publisher's Name is defined
  • Where are Rules for Publisher's Name in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Information for Publisher's Name in RDA
  • How is Publisher's Name Transcribed / Recorded in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
  • More than One Publisher in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
  • Publisher's Name in More Than One Language or Script
  • No Publisher Identified in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
  • MARC 21 Field 264
  • RDA Examples of Recording Publisher's Name in MARC 21 Field 264

CORE ELEMENT: Publisher's Name is a Core Element; if more than one publisher’s name appears on the source of information, only the first recorded is required.

How is Publisher's Name is definedAccording to the Glossary of Library and Information Science of Librarianship Studies and Information Technology blog, the name of publisher is the name of a person, family, or corporate body responsible for publishing, releasing, or issuing a document or resource. For early printed resources, printers and booksellers are treated as publishers. There are the special set of rules for transcription and recording of the name of the publisher in library cataloging standards, e.g., RDA rules for publisher's name is given in chapter 2 of Resource Description and Access (RDA). In Anglo-American Cataloging Rules 2nd edition (AACR2), rules for the date of publication, distribution etc. for books are given in chapter 2 (2.4D).

Where are Rules for Publisher's Name in RDALook at instruction 2.8.4 in RDA Toolkit.

What are the Sources of Information for Publisher's Name in RDA: Take places of publication from the following sources (in order of preference):

a) the same source as the title proper

b) another source within the resource itself

c) one of the other sources of information specified under 2.2.4

How is Publisher's Name Transcribed / Recorded in Resource Description and Access (RDA)Record the publisher's name applying the basic instructions on recording publication statements given under 2.8.1 -- “in the form in which they appear on the source of information.” LC-PCC PS 2.8.4.3 states, “Generally do not omit levels in corporate hierarchy.”
Record words or phrases indicating the function (other than solely publishing) performed by a person, family, or corporate body as they appear on the source of information.

More than One Publisher in Resource Description and Access (RDA): If more than one entity is named as a publisher of the resource, record the entities in the order indicated by the sequence, layout, or typography of the names on the source of information.

Publisher's Name in More Than One Language or Script: If the name of a publisher appears on the source of information in more than one language or script, record the form that is in the language or script of the title proper. If this criterion does not apply, record the name in the language or script that appears first.

No Publisher Identified in Resource Description and Access (RDA)For a resource in a published form, if no publisher is named within the resource, and cannot be identified from other sources, record [publisher not identified].  Do not record [s.n.] as was done in AARC2 cataloging.

MARC 21 Field 264264 - Production, Publication, Distribution, Manufacture, and Copyright Notice (R)

First Indicator
Sequence of statements
# - Not applicable/No information provided/Earliest
2 - Intervening
3 - Current/Latest

Second Indicator
Function of entity
0 - Production
1 - Publication
2 - Distribution
3 - Manufacture
4 - Copyright notice date

Subfield Codes
$a - Place of production, publication, distribution, manufacture (R)
$b - Name of producer, publisher, distributor, manufacturer (R)
$c - Date of production, publication, distribution, manufacture, or copyright notice (R)
$3 - Materials specified (NR)
$6 - Linkage (NR)
$8 - Field link and sequence number (R)

Subfield Code
$b - Name of producer, publisher, distributor, manufacturer (R)

264 #1 $a Boston : $b [publisher not identified], $c 2010. [On source: Published in Boston, 2010]

264 #3 $a Cambridge : $b Kinsey Printing Company [On source: Cambridge -- Kinsey Printing Company; No distribution information]

RDA Examples of Recording Publisher's Name in MARC 21 Field 264:

       264 #1 $a New York :$b J.J. Wilson Publishing Company
not: 264 #1 $a New York :$b Wilson Pub. Co.

source: Humanities Association, Literature Division, Renaissance Literature Section
record : 264 #1 $a Chicago : $b Humanities Association, Literature Division, Renaissance Literature Section 
(Do not rearrange a hierarchy to put the larger body first. Transcribe in the order given.)

source: Toronto -- Pilkington Pub. Co.
             Houston -- Davidson Publishers
record: 264 #1 $a Toronto : $b Pilkington Pub. Co.
(Transcribe abbreviations that are used on the source. Do not abbreviate words appearing in full.)

Following examples are from OCLC:

264 #1 ‡a [Place of publication not identified] : ‡b ABC Publishers, ‡c 2009.
264 #2 ‡a Seattle : ‡b Iverson Company
[On source: ABC Publishers, 2009; distributed by Iverson Company, Seattle]

264 #1 ‡a New York, New York : ‡b Dell Publishing Co., Inc., ‡c [1972]

264 #1 ‡a New York, N.Y. : ‡b New York Labor News Company, ‡c [1961]

264 #1 ‡a [Chicago?] : ‡b Chicago and North Western Line, ‡c [1940?]

264 #1 ‡a New York : ‡b Basic Books, a member of the Perseus Books Group, ‡c [2014]

264 #1 ‡a Munchen, Germany : ‡b C.H. Beck ; ‡a Oxford, United Kingdom : ‡b Hart ; ‡a Baden-Baden, Germany : ‡b Nomos ; ‡a Basel, Switzerland : ‡b Helbing Lichtenhahn, ‡c 2014.

Case: One or more agencies are sponsoring bodies rather than publishers:

Source: Published by Library Management Ltd. New Delhi For The Institute of Information Science Chicago University And The University College, London
264 #1 New Delhi : ‡b Published by Library Management Ltd. for the  Institute of Information Science, Chicago University, and the University College, London

Source: Published for the University College, London, England by University of Cambridge University Press    Cambridge Oxford
264 #1 Cambridge : ‡b Published for the University College, London, England, by Cambridge University Press

Source: Indian Publishers, New Delhi for Indian Institute of Dalit Studies, New Delhi
264 #1 New Delhi : ‡b Indian Publishers for Indian Institute of Dalit Studies

Source: Published by Facet Publications on behalf of American Library Association
264 #1 New York, N.Y. : ‡b Facet Publications on behalf of American Library Association

264 #2 ‡a [Place of distribution not identified] : ‡b Distributed by Hal Leonard

264 #3 ‡a Hong Kong : ‡b [manufacturer not identified], ‡c [1995]


Source : Based on information from Library of CongressRDA Blog, OCLC and RDA Toolkit

See also:
This article is updated in RDA Frequently Asked Questions
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Thursday, December 24, 2015

Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) : Assigning and Constructing

Library of Congress Subject Headings LCSH

Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) : Assigning and Constructing

http://librarianshipstudies.blogspot.com/2015/12/library-of-congress-subject-headings.html

New Post on Librarianship Studies & Information Technology Blog provides a comprehensive and most up-to-date description of Assigning and Constructing Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) : Principles, Practices, and Examples From Subject Headings Manual (SHM) Instruction Sheet H 180 (Visit above link to read complete article ... ... ...)



BACKGROUND: This instruction sheet contains general practices followed by the Library of Congress for assigning subject headings to individual works being cataloged and for constructing subject heading strings in the Library of Congress subject heading system. This instruction sheet begins after the initial steps of subject analysis have taken place, that is, after an examination of the item to determine its subject focus and an identification of how that basic subject is expressed with the controlled vocabulary of the Library of Congress subject heading system.
Contents:
1. General rule (how-to assign Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) to the work being cataloged) 
2. Cataloging treatment (how-to assign Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) corresponding to the cataloging treatment of the work) 
3. Number of headings (what is the number of Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) required in a catalog record) 
4. Specificity (in assigning Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH))
5. Depth of indexing (how-to assign Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) that most closely correspond to the overall coverage of the work) 
6. General topic and subtopic; principle vs. specific case (how-to assign Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) if a work discusses a general topic with emphasis on a particular subtopic, or presents a principle and illustrates the principle with a specific case or example)
7. Two or three related headings (how-to assign Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) if a heading exists, or can be established, that represents the two or three topics discussed in a work)
8. Rule of three (when it is appropriate to assign up-to three Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH))
9. Rule of four (when it is appropriate to assign up-to four Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH))
10. Multi-element topics (How-to assign Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) if a work discusses a complex or compound topic for which a single heading neither exists nor can be practically constructed or established)
11. Additional aspects (How-to assign Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) with important additional aspects, such as limitation to a specific place or time, focus on specific named entities, and presentation in a particular form)
12. Concepts in titles (How-to assign Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) to bring out concepts in titles and subtitles)
13. Additional headings (How-to assign additional Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) which are required because of the complex nature of certain topics, or special practices that have been developed for particular topics)
14. Objectivity (Principle to avoid assigning Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) that label topics or express personal value judgments regarding topics or materials)
15. Constructing headings (Examples of different types of Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH))
16. Complete subject heading strings with subdivisions (Addition of subdivisions to Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) to complete subject heading strings)

Major Steps in the subject cataloging process: Principles of SLAM

Translate into LCSH

Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) is the most widely used Subject Heading List throughout the world. Even though all libraries use LCSH to provide Subject Heading, most of them are not aware of the proper guidelines and practices for applying LCSH headings. I am saying this from my experience of working in some major libraries in India, namely the National Library of India, Central Reference Library, and the Indian School of Business Library and observing the catalogs of various libraries of different countries and also records in WorldCat database of OCLC, world's largest library catalog. Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) is one of the focus areas of Librarianship Studies & Information Technology Blog. It aims to generate awareness and provide information to librarians and catalogers about Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) based on international standards. Till recently Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) and Subject Headings Manual (SHM) were available as paid products from LC and were very costly. Now that these are made available for free, it is a great initiative and service by the Library of Congress to the profession of librarianship and libraries should cash this opportunity to provide Subject Headings in their catalogs in the correct way using LCSH.

See also:
Please provide us your valuable feedback in the Guest Book on Contact Us page to make Librarianship Studies & Information Technology Blog a better place for information on Library and Information Science and Information Technology related to libraries. Let us know your feedback of this article. You can also suggest edits/additions to this article: Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) : Assigning and Constructing  of Subject Headings Manual (SHM)

Librarianship Studies & Information Technology Blog will be more focused on Library Technical Processing and Information Access Through The Subject with special reference to the techniques of Library of Congress Classification (LCC) and Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) by use of Classification & Shelflisting Manual (CSM), Subject Headings Manual (SHM), and Classification Web tool of Library of Congress. Librarianship Studies Blog will also highlight the history, development, and techniques of providing classification number using Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC).

Follow Librarianship Studies & Information Technology in Social Media blog to be updated of new items and to start/comment on the discussions in the Google+ Community Librarianship Studies & Information Technology and Facebook Group Librarianship Studies & Information Technology.

Read now complete article: http://librarianshipstudies.blogspot.com/2015/12/library-of-congress-subject-headings.html

Saturday, December 5, 2015

Subject Headings Manual : Glossary of Library & Information Science

Library of Congress Subject Headings LCSH


http://librarianshipstudies.blogspot.com/2015/11/subject-headings-manual.html

New Post on Librarianship Studies & Information Technology Blog provides a comprehensive and most up-to-date description of Subject Headings Manual (SHM)

Subject Headings Manual (SHM) provides guidelines to use Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). The manual was originally conceived as an in-house procedure manual to aid subject catalogers at the Library of Congress in constructing and assigning Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) in an accurate and consistent manner. SHM includes explanations of subject cataloging policy, procedures, and practices for the catalogers at Library of Congress in providing LCSH subject headings to bibliographic records and constructing new headings to be included in LCSH. Other libraries who wish to catalog in the same manner as the Library of Congress as well as faculty at schools of library and information science who wish to teach Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) to their students should follow the guidelines of the Subject Headings Manual (SHM) ... … … (Visit link mentioned above to read complete article)

This new encyclopedic entry in the Glossary of Library & Information Science of the Librarianship Studies & Information Technology Blog answers following questions about Subject Headings Manual (SHM)
  • What is Subject Headings Manual (SHM)? 
  • What is history of Subject Headings Manual (SHM)? 
  • What is the cost of Subject Headings Manual (SHM)? 
  • How SHM is revised? 
  • Where can we get free SHM? 
  • How to give LCSH in a bibliographic record according to international standards?
Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) is the most widely used Subject Heading List throughout the world. Even though all libraries use LCSH to provide Subject Heading, most of them are not aware of the proper guidelines and practices for applying LCSH headings. I am saying this from my experience of working in some major libraries in India, namely the National Library of IndiaCentral Reference Library, and the Indian School of Business Library and observing the catalogs of various libraries of different countries and also records in WorldCat database OCLC, world's largest library catalog. Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) is one of the focus areas of Librarianship Studies & Information Technology Blog. It aims to generate awareness and provide information to librarians and catalogers about Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) based on international standards. Till recently Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) and Subject Headings Manual (SHM) were available as paid products from LC and were very costly. Now that these are made available for free, it is a great initiative and service by the Library of Congress to the profession of librarianship and libraries should cash this opportunity to provide Subject Headings in their catalogs in the correct way. 

Librarianship Studies & Information Technology Blog will be more focused on Information Access Through The Subject with special reference to the techniques of Library of Congress Classification (LCC) and Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) by use of Classification & Shelflisting Manual (CSM), Subject Headings Manual (SHM), and Classification Web tool of Library of Congress. Librarianship Studies Blog will also highlight the history, development, and techniques of providing classification number using Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC).

Librarianship Studies & Information Technology (LS & IT) Blog is envisioned as an Encyclopedia, Wikipedia, and Khan Academy of Library and Information Science; an authoritative source for consultation and reference for any library or information profession related issue and a treasure hub of knowledge on Library and Information Science.

Follow Librarianship Studies & Information Technology blog in Social Media to be updated of new items and to start/comment on the discussions in the Google+ Community Librarianship Studies & Information Technology and Facebook Group Librarianship Studies & Information Technology.