Saturday, November 23, 2013

Preferred title/Uniform title - MARC to RDA Mapping

MARC 21
FIELD
TAG
MARC 21
SUBFIELD CODE
MARC 21 FIELD /
SUBFIELD NAME
RDA
INSTRUCTION
NUMBER
RDA
ELEMENT
NAME
240Uniform title
240aUniform title6.2.2Preferred Title for the Work
240aUniform title6.3Form of Work
240aUniform title6.4Date of Work
240aUniform title6.5Place of Origin of the Work
240aUniform title6.6Other Distinguishing Characteristic of the Work
240dDate of treaty signing6.4Date of Work
240fDate of a work6.10Date of Expression
240gMiscellaneous information6.22Signatory to a Treaty, etc.
240hMedium6.9Content Type
240kForm subheading6.2.2Preferred Title for the Work
240lLanguage of a work6.11Language of Expression
240mMedium of performance for music6.15Medium of Performance
240nNumber of part/section of a work6.2.2Preferred Title for the Work
240nNumber of part/section of a work6.3Form of Work
240nNumber of part/section of a work6.4Date of Work
240nNumber of part/section of a work6.5Place of Origin of the Work
240nNumber of part/section of a work6.6Other Distinguishing Characteristic of the Work
240nNumber of part/section of a work6.16Numeric Designation of a Musical Work
240oArranged statement for music6.12Other Distinguishing Characteristic of the Expression
240pName of part/section of a work6.2.2Preferred Title for the Work
240pName of part/section of a work6.3Form of Work
240pName of part/section of a work6.4Date of Work
240pName of part/section of a work6.5Place of Origin of the Work
240pName of part/section of a work6.6Other Distinguishing Characteristic of the Work
240rKey for music6.17Key
240sVersion6.12Other Distinguishing Characteristic of the Expression

[Source: RDA Toolkit]

See also:

Thanks all for your love, suggestions, testimonials, likes, +1, tweets and shares ....

See also related posts in following RDA Blog Categories (Labels):

240 - Uniform Title (NR) - MARC 21 Bibliographic - Full

240 - Uniform Title (NR)


First IndicatorSecond Indicator
Uniform title printed or displayed
0 - Not printed or displayed
1 - Printed or displayed

Subfield Codes
  • $a - Uniform title (NR)
  • $d - Date of treaty signing (R)
  • $f - Date of a work (NR)
  • $g - Miscellaneous information (R)
  • $h - Medium (NR)
  • $k - Form subheading (R)
  • $l - Language of a work (NR)
  • $m - Medium of performance for music (R)
  • $n - Number of part/section of a work (R)
  • $o - Arranged statement for music (NR)
  • $p - Name of part/section of a work (R)
  • $r - Key for music (NR)
  • $s - Version (NR)
  • $0 - Authority record control number or standard number (R)
  • $6 - Linkage (NR)
  • $8 - Field link and sequence number (R)

Nonfiling characters
0-9 - Number of nonfiling characters



Definition:

The uniform title identifies an item if it has appeared under varying titles. It brings together records for items entered under both personal and corporate names and bearing variant titles. Use for uniform titles that follow the main entry ( field 100, field 110 or field 111). Use field 130 for uniform titles that are the main entry.

For current cataloging, construct uniform titles according to AACR2 and LC practice. Search the OCLC Authority File to verify forms of entry. Use the current AACR2 or AACR2-compatible form of entry. If that form is unknown, construct the heading according to AACR2.

For retrospective cataloging, search the OCLC Authority File to verify forms of entry. Use the current AACR2 or AACR2-compatible form of entry. If that form is unknown, you may enter the pre-AACR2 form, but you are encouraged to construct the heading according to AACR2.

See also:



Why RDA?

Why RDA?


Let’s first encounter head-on the questions from those who ask:
“Why we don’t just amend AACR2 again, like we used to?”

To address such questions, we need to:
  • Examine the current cataloging environment -- and how it continues to evolve
  • Perceive how Resource Description and Access (RDA) is an improvement over AACR2 as a tool for that environment


The Cataloging Environment


Catalogs are no longer isolated within the walls of an institution. Bibliographic data from any source can now be integrated into the wider Internet environment. New kinds of links can be made, and new displays can be generated for users from data packaged in new ways -- all of it on a global scale in multiple languages and scripts. These can be called ‘linked data systems.’  We now have the technology to provide global connection anywhere that computers can operate.  That includes the digital connections of cell phones or smart phones with Internet connections to link to any user -- any place -- any time.

The information systems and content in the future will be accessible on the Web. The elements that describe our resources will be available to libraries and users everywhere in the world through a Web front-end that connects users to services and data. That data may come from publishers, from creators, from libraries and other institutions … or from anywhere.

Actually, bibliographic data and digital resources are already on the Web, and we’ve started adding the controlled vocabularies from libraries to help identify resources. RDA enables us to identify all the identifying characteristics of all the things we have in our collections, in ways that machines and the Internet can manipulate for more useful displays for users.

Our entire cataloging environment continues to evolve:
  • It is increasingly Web-based.
  • We need to catalog a much wider range of information carriers than we did in the past.
  • We need to deal with many more types of content and complexity of content in the resources that we catalog.
  • Metadata is now created by a wider range of people, who have a wider range of skill levels -- not only by skilled professional catalogers, but by support staff, non-library staff, vendors, wikipedians, and also publishers.  Some of us are using structures other than the MARC format for our records (e.g., using Dublin Core for some digital resources).
And we now have access to descriptive data for resources in digital form – even when the resource is in standard book format, the descriptive data is now available from many publishers using ONIX, which is information we can capture for our bibliographic records.

In the digital world we sometimes find that basic bibliographic description is an integral part of a digital object - the software that helps create the digital object or digitizes an analog object, automatically provides a basic set of metadata, that is attributes or data elements.  Think of how the software for word processing, like Microsoft Word, suggests a name for your document based on the first words you type (ironically the “titles” for early manuscripts were the first line of text, too!)  Or how it can automatically provide the date you created the document. So we can envision the automatic creation of some of the bibliographic information our cataloging systems can capture, saving the cataloger’s time.  RDA builds on this to emphasize transcribing what you see for the basic elements of bibliographic description (‘the representation principle’).

A key aspect of this new “Semantic Web” environment is that it is built on element-based metadata schemas and vocabularies -- and that is exactly what RDA delivers.

The Problems with AACR2


During the 1990’s there were many complaints about how unsatisfactory AACR2 was:
  • “It has become increasingly complex”
  • “There is no logical structure”
  • “It mixes content and carrier data”
  • “Hierarchical and other important relationships are not adequately addressed” 
  • “It reflects an Anglo-American centric viewpoint” 
  • “It pre-dates the FRBR entity-relationship conceptual model”
  • “There is not enough support for the ‘collocation’ function of cataloging”
  • “It did not foresee the Internet or the existence of well-formed metadata or vocubularies”

[Source: Library of Congress]


RELATIONSHIP DESIGNATORS - QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

RESOURCE DESCRIPTION & ACCESS RDA

Question: I have seen some of the OCLC records coming with relationship designator “Joint author” for collaborative works, can retain the term as it is or change it to “author” because as such there is no term called “joint author” is defined in the Appendix I2.

Answer: “Joint author” is not in Appendix I, so we have to use “author” instead. As discussed in the document via http://www.loc.gov/aba/pcc/rda/PCC%20RDA%20guidelines/Relat-Desig-Guidelines.docx we are supposed to use terms from Appendix I. Guideline 4 does provide for exceptions for element names (for example “creator” or “producer”) if they are more appropriate.


RDA RELATIONSHIP DESIGNATORS
RDA RELATIONSHIP DESIGNATORS

Number of Bibliographic Volumes Differing from Number of Physical Volumes - Questions and Answers

Question: AACR2 says If the number of bibliographic volumes differs from the number of physical volumes, give the number of bibliographic volumes followed by in and the number of physical volumes: 8 v. in 5. How will we treat this in RDA.

Answer: Relevant RDA rule is given below from RDA Toolkit.

RDA rule 3.21.2.8 is for "Number of Bibliographic Volumes Differing from Number of Physical Volumes"

According to this rule it should be given in MARC as:

300 $a 5 volumes
500 $a 8 bibliographic volumes in 5 physical volumes

Please note that 3.21.2.8 is revised. Earlier it was numbered as 3.22.2.8.

Note: Serials are exception.

[Revised: 2015-02-04]

Distributor's Name - Questions and Answers

RESOURCE DESCRIPTION & ACCESS RDA

Question: I have a book on which distributor statement is given as "Distributed by National Book Trust". Now the MARC 264 field with second indicator 2 stands for Distribution statement. So how should we transcribe distributor statement.
i) National Book Trust
or
ii) Distributed by National Book Trust

Answer: Distributed by National Book Trust

According to RDA Rule 2.9.4.4 for "Statement of Function" you have to Record words or phrases indicating the function performed by a person, family, or corporate body as they appear on the source of information.

Edition statement - MARC to RDA Mapping

MARC 21
FIELD
TAG
MARC 21
SUBFIELD CODE
MARC 21 FIELD /
SUBFIELD NAME
RDA
INSTRUCTION
NUMBER
RDA
ELEMENT
NAME
250Edition statement
250aEdition statement2.5.2Designation of Edition
250aEdition statement2.5.6Designation of a Named Revision of an Edition
250bRemainder of edition statement2.5.3Parallel Designation of Edition
250bRemainder of edition statement2.5.4Statement of Responsibility Relating to the Edition
250bRemainder of edition statement2.5.5Parallel Statement of Responsibility Relating to the Edition
250bRemainder of edition statement2.5.6Designation of a Named Revision of an Edition
250bRemainder of edition statement2.5.7Parallel Designation of a Named Revision of an Edition
250bRemainder of edition statement2.5.8Statement of Responsibility Relating to a Named Revision of an Edition
250bRemainder of edition statement2.5.9Parallel Statement of Responsibility Relating to a Named Revision of an Edition

[Source: RDA Toolkit]

See also:

Thanks all for your love, suggestions, testimonials, likes, +1, tweets and shares ....

See also related posts in following RDA Blog Categories (Labels):

250 - Edition Statement (R) - MARC 21 Bibliographic - Full




250  Edition Statement (R)


Input Standards

Required if applicable/Required if applicable
1st Indicator  Undefined
blank characterUndefined
2nd Indicator  Undefined
blank characterUndefined
Subfields (R=Repeatable  NR=Nonrepeatable)Input Standards
‡aEdition statement (R)Mandatory/Mandatory
‡bRemainder of edition statement (NR)Required if applicable/Required if applicable
‡3Materials specified (NR)Optional/Optional

Definition

An edition statement is a word or phrase appearing in the resource that normally indicates a difference in either content or form between the resource and a related resource. An edition statement can often be identified by the use of words such as edition, issue, level, state, update, and version, or their equivalents in other languages. Numbers and/or statements of responsibility may also appear with an edition statement. Under RDA, the edition statement is a transcribed element and no abbreviations are used unless they appear in the source used for the edition statement.
250Edition 1965-1966.
250First edition, new corrected printing.
250Third impression (with minor revisions).
250Canadian edition.
250[Kindle edition].
250Level I, version 1.00.
2506th issue, 2nd printing.
250Update 3/1/83.
250[1st issue, unexpurgated].
250[2nd state with chandelier burnished from plate and figures of serving-boy, etc.].
2503rd draft, December 2014.
250Teacher's edition.
250Authorized French language edition.
250Interactive version.
250Medium voice range.
A statement of revision, including the word revised (or its equivalent in other languages) alone, with modifications, or as a modifier, is an edition statement.
250[Revised and up-to-date].
250Revised edition.
250Revised.
250Revised second edition.
250[Slightly revised].
250Neu revidiert.
An edition statement may include a personal, corporate, or family name as a statement of responsibility.
250Second edition / ‡b revised by M.C.F. Proctor.
250New and enlarged edition / ‡b by members of the staff of the Gardeners' Chronicle.
A phrase that includes only the word revised and a personal name, however, is not an edition statement. The following italicized phrases are statements of responsibility (use field 245 subfield ‡c), not edition statements.
24510Aristotle's ethics : ‡b writings from the complete works / ‡c revised, edited, and with an introduction by Jonathan Barnes and Anthony Kenny.
24500Sunspot numbers, 1610-1985 : ‡b based on "The sunspot activity in the years 1610-1960" / ‡c revised by John A. McKinnon.
A statement such as abridged or unabridged (or their equivalents in other languages) alone, with modifications, or as a modifier, is an edition statement.
250Abridged.
250Unabridged.
250Abridged edition.
250Complete and unabridged edition.
A statement indicating the pre-publication state of a resource (proofs, galleys, advance copies, etc.) is an edition statement.
250Uncorrected page proof.
250Advance reader's copy.
250[Uncorrected galley].
250Prepublication copy.
250[Advance uncorrected proofs].
An edition statement may include information about new material.
2502nd ed. / ‡b edited with an introduction and notes by H.A. Rose, new impression.
[Source: OCLC]