Wednesday, June 26, 2013

About This Blog

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RDA Blog : RDA Blog is a blog on Resource Description and Access (RDA), a new library cataloging standard that provides instructions and guidelines on formulating data for resource description and discovery, organized based on the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR), intended for use by libraries and other cultural organizations replacing Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR2). This blog lists description and links to resources on Resource Description & Access (RDA). It is an attempt to bring together at one place all the useful and important information, rules, references, news, and links on Resource Description and AccessFRBRFRADFRSADMARC standardsAACR2BIBFRAME, and other items related to current developments and trends in library cataloging practice.

RDA Blog History: RDA Blog was created by Salman Haider, a Cataloging & Metadata Librarian Blogger & Online Social Media Expert from India. RDA Blog embarked on its journey to provide useful information to Resource Description and Access (RDA) in August 2011. It received good response from librarians, catalogers, and library professionals from all around the world. It is interesting to note that the first hundred thousand pageviews to RDA Blog came in 3 years, but it took just 8 months to reach another hundred thousand pageviews. At present it is viewed at a rate of fifteen to twenty thousand times per month. RDA Blog is widely followed in social media.

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Sunday, June 23, 2013

GENERAL GUIDELINES ON TRANSCRIPTION

LC-PCC PS for 1.7.1 (RDA)


GENERAL GUIDELINES ON TRANSCRIPTION 

(Below is the Table of Contents; for complete text of this LC-PCC PS, click above)
  • Introduction 
LC practice/PCC practice: This Policy Statement is an overall statement related to punctuation/spacing conventions. For convenience, it addresses in one place conventions applicable to access points in bibliographic and name authority records and those applicable to other parts of the bibliographic record.
Much of the data in a MARC record are explicitly identified by content designation (tags, indicators, subfield codes). Upon output or display, the content designation is used to determine various display conventions including spacing. Internally there is often no spacing at all but instead content designation, particularly subfield codes. In displays that do not show content designation, spacing is substituted. How much spacing is at the discretion of a particular system. However, for data that are not subfielded (e.g, the constituent elements of a corporate name serving as a qualifier, the unsubfielded units in a linking entry field (hereafter "linking entry"), unsubfielded statements or data in MARC field 245), it is necessary to establish the spacing to be input. The computerized environment is oriented to a single-space convention throughout authority and bibliographic records.
Note that some systems display a space on either side of a subfield code to aid the comprehension of subfielded data. Such "spaces" are also a function of display, i.e., they are not carried internally. In the examples in this policy statement, no spaces are used on either side of a MARC subfield code to insure that there is no confusion about the spacing convention being illustrated.
  • Access Points in Name Authority and Bibliographic Records (General)
1. Punctuation/spacing within access points.
a) Spaces following periods.
b) Punctuation preceding the name of a language in authorized access points of works or expressions. 
c) Ampersand.
d) Parenthesis. 
e) Quotation mark. 
f) Open date. 
2. Ending mark of punctuation.
a) Name authority records. 
b) Bibliographic records. 
  • Access Points for Persons in Name Authority and Bibliographic Records
1. Initials/letters

2. Abbreviated or missing portions of preferred names.

3. Prefixes (articles and prepositions) in certain names.

4. Subfield $i (Relationship information) in authority records.

5. Bibliographic description.
  • Access Points for Corporate Names, Including Meetings, in Name Authority and Bibliographic Records
1. Quotation marks.

2. Initials.

3. Abbreviations

4. Place name at end.

5. Subfield $i (Relationship information) in authority records.
  • Bibliographic Linking Entries
  • Punctuation at the End of MARC Fields 245, 246-247, 250, 264, 300, 310/321, 362, 490
  • Punctuation in Subfields $3 in MARC Fields 264, 490
  • Punctuation in Subfield $x in MARC 8XX Fields
  • Punctuation in Notes
1. Additional information expected.

2. Ending mark of punctuation (5XX).

3. Square brackets
  • Temporary/Uncertain Data

    [Source: Based on information from RDA Toolkit]

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Access Points for Persons in Name Authority and Bibliographic Records

LC practice/PCC practice:

1. Initials/letters
a) Name portion of authorized access point
i) Periods. If the name of a person consists of or contains initials, input a period after an initial if it is certain that the letter is an initial. In case of doubt, do not input a period. If the name consists of separate letters that are presumed not to be initials, omit or include periods according to the predominant usage of the person.

EXAMPLE
100 1#$aEliot, T. S.
100 0#$aH. D.
100 0#$aX Y Z
ii)
Spaces. If the name contains two or more forenames represented by initials, consists entirely of initials, or consists entirely of separate letters that are not initials, input a single space between the initials/letters in all cases (regardless of whether they are followed by periods or not).

EXAMPLE
100 1#$aEliot, T. S.
100 0#$aH. D.
100 0#$aX Y Z
b)
Other elements in authorized access point
i)
Periods. With initials, include periods unless the author’s predominant usage makes it clear that the author omits them.
ii)
Spaces. Do not leave spaces between single initials/letters.

EXAMPLE
100 0#$aAngela,$cSister, O.S.B.
2. Abbreviated or missing portions of preferred names. If a part of a preferred name is abbreviated (two or more letters present as opposed to a single letter used as an initial) or if a forename is missing from a name entered under surname, do not leave open space after the abbreviation or missing forename. Instead, insert, as appropriate,

EXAMPLE
a period
100 1#$aTissot
Add period at end in bibliographic record, but not in authority record
100 1#$aCorpeleijn, W. F. Th.
100 1#$aJunager, Sv.-Aa.
a period and one space
100 1#$aEnschedé, Ch. J.
a period and a comma
100 1#$aJones, Th.,$d1910-
100 1#$aCalles Ll., Alfonso
100 1#$aDahlan Aman, Mohd.,$cHaji
For these names, add a period at end in bibliographic record, but not in authority record
3. Prefixes (articles and prepositions) in certain names. Once authorized and variant access points for a person have been determined according to RDA 9.2.2.11 and RDA 9.2.3.10, use the following guidelines in encoding the constituent parts of the authorized and variant access points. Apply these guidelines, as appropriate, to authorized and variant access points in a name authority record and to authorized access points (including subjects) in a bibliographic record. In the examples used in the guidelines, only the germane variants have been shown.
a)
Prefix immediately follows the first element. If the first element of an authorized or variant access point for a person is followed directly by a prefix without intervening data (e.g., forename(s), name(s) serving the function of a forename as in the case of certain Portuguese names, forename initial(s)), separate the prefix from the first element by a comma and place the prefix, etc., in the MARC record as part of the $c subfield, the subfield for words and phrases associated with the authorized or variant access point. The purpose of this practice is to prevent prefixes from being treated as forenames.

EXAMPLE
100 1#$aWalle-Lissnijder,$cvan de
400 1#$aLissnijder,$cvan de Walle
400 1#$aVan de Walle-Lissnijder
400 1#$aWalle-Lissnijder, Edm. van de
100 1#$aDe Sanctis
400 1#$aSanctis,$cDe
100 1#$aCordemoy, Géraud de,$d-1864
400 1#$aFourneillis,$cdes,$d-1684
100 1#$aDiego O., Carlos A. de
400 1#$aDiego,$cde
b)
Prefixes in names lacking forenames but containing words or phrases associated with an authorized or variant access point. Formulate such authorized or variant access points with the prefixes following any words or phrases associated with the name.

EXAMPLE
100 1#$aWinter,$cDoctor de
400 0#$aDoctor de Winter
100 1#$aL'Epée, Charles-Michel de,$d1712-1789
400 1#$aL'Epée,$cabbé de$q(Charles-Michel),$d1712-1789
100 1#$aLa Fayette,$cMadame de$q(Marie-Madelaine Pioche de La Vergne),$d1634-1693
400 1#$aLaFayette,$cMadame de$q(Marie-Madelaine Pioche de La Vergne),$d1634-1693
400 1#$aFayette,$cMadame de La$q(Marie-Madelaine Pioche de La Vergne),$d1634-1693
400 1#$aDe La Fayette,$cMadame$q(Marie-Madelaine Pioche de La Vergne),$d1634-1693
400 0#$aMadame de La Fayette$q(Marie-Madelaine Pioche de La Vergne),$d1634-1693
c)
Names in category b. above that include qualifications. Formulate the data constituting the authorized or variant access points according to the pattern: first element of the authorized or variant access point, words or phrases associated with the name ($c subfield), prefix, qualifier, date.

EXAMPLE
100 1#$aLettow-Vorbeck,$cGeneral von$q(Paul Emil),$d1870-1964
400 1#$aVorbeck, Lettow,$cGeneral von$q(Paul Emil),$d1870-1964
400 1#$aLettow-Vorbeck,$cColonel von$q(Paul Emil),$d1870-1964
400 1#$aVon Lettow-Vorbeck,$cGeneral$q(Paul Emil),$d1870-1964
100 1#$aGatti de Gamond,$cMadame$q(Zoé Charlotte),$d1812-1854
400 1#$aDe Gamond, Gatti,$cMadame$q(Zoé Charlotte),$d1812-1854
400 1#$aGamond, Gatti de,$cMadame$q(Zoé Charlotte),$d1812-1854
100 1#$aSigaud de La Fond,$c M.$q(Joseph Aignan),$d1730-1810
400 1#$aDe La Fond, Sigaud,$cM.$q(Joseph Aignan),$d 1730-1810
400 1#$aLa Fond, Sigaud de,$cM.$q(Joseph Aignan),$d1730-1810
400 1#$aFond, Sigaud de La,$cM.$q(Joseph Aignan),$d1730-1810
4. Subfield $i (Relationship information) in authority records. When subfield $i for relationship designator is used in a 5XX field, begin the field with subfield $w r. Give subfield $i as the second subfield; the first word in the relationship designator is capitalized, and the subfield ends with a colon.

EXAMPLE
110 2#$aI.M. Pei Associates
500 1#$wr$iFounder:$aPei, I. M.,$d1917-
5. Bibliographic description. Note that the spacing and punctuation conventions applied to personal names used in access points may differ from those used in the descriptive portion of a bibliographic record.



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